substitute for brown rice syrup
Ingredient Substitutes

9 Easy Substitutes For Brown Rice Syrup That Taste The Same

Brown rice syrup is a thick sugary liquid derived from brown rice. It is made by breaking down the starches in brown rice into smaller sugars with the help of enzymes. Once the impurities are filtered out, the resulting product is a thick sugary syrup like maple syrup and honey.

Brown rice syrup is a healthier alternative to regular sugar because it’s almost pure glucose. Normal sugars tend to be high in fructose, which can be detrimental to your health when consumed in excess. Need a substitute for brown rice syrup? Here’s a list of some of the best alternatives you can use.

#1. Honey

Honey
Honey

Honey is made by bees using the nectar they drain from flowering plants and store in their comb. Before table sugar rose to popularity, honey was the primary sweetener used throughout the world because of its ease of access and many medicinal properties. Honey is the number one alternative to brown rice syrup. It’s a 100% natural sweetener with lots of different vitamins, minerals, and antioxidant properties.

Honey gives you virtually the same sweetness, richness, and consistency as brown rice syrup. Consider swapping brown rice sugar with some honey or glaze it on waffles, pancakes, and other baked desserts for a delectable sweet finish. Just note, the color, texture, and taste of different honey products may vary slightly depending on the nectar source.

1 Cup Brown Rice Syrup = ¾ Cup Honey

#2. Date Syrup

Date Syrup
Date Syrup

Like honey, date syrup is also one of the oldest sweeteners in use to date. Date syrup carries a rich supply of nutrients like potassium, magnesium, calcium, and fibers and has antioxidant properties that boost heart health and improve the immune system.

Date syrup comes from the date palm fruit, a tropical tree native to the Middle East and North Africa. It has a deep dark color and tastes sweeter than honey with mild hints of cinnamon, and the consistency is thicker compared to brown rice syrup.

Date syrup is usually available in most supermarkets, but if not, try searching for a Middle-Eastern store. Alternatively, you purchase some dates and make date syrup at home. All you have to do is heat dates in water for an hour, blend them, and filter the mixture to get the syrup.

1 Cup Brown Rice Syrup = 3 Tbsp. Date Syrup

#3. Fruit Puree

Fruit Puree
Fruit Puree

Fruit puree can make a pretty decent substitute for brown rice syrup as a topping over desserts. However, it can add an acidic tang depending on the fruits you use, so think twice before adding fruit puree to something like coffee. To use fruit puree as a sweetener, you need to combine it with dishes and drinks that can pair with the taste of whatever fruit you’re using.

For instance, bananas work well with milk. So, you can use banana puree and make a tasty banana-sweetened milk beverage. Plus, most fruits are a better source of essential vitamins and minerals, so fruit puree is also a healthier alternative.

There are many commercial fruit purees you can buy at the supermarket, or you could also make it at home by pressing fresh fruits. The sweetness will vary depending on the fruit. If you’re replacing brown rice syrup, never use more than a cup of fruit puree. Using too much will alter the final taste.

1 Cup Brown Rice Syrup = ½ Cup Fruit Puree

#4. Maple Syrup

Maple Syrup
Maple Syrup

Maple syrup is a thick sugary liquid substance that comes from the sap of the Maple tree. It’s not a very high nutrient substitute but is a good source of zinc, iron, and manganese. It is arguably the most delicious substitute for brown rice syrup in all beverages and desserts.

Restaurants and eateries use maple syrup to top baked dishes like waffles and pancakes. However, you can also use it as a sweetener in your drinks, including coffee and tea. Just note, it will probably also add hints of other flavors like butterscotch toffee or caramel.

1 Cup Brown Rice Syrup = ¾ Cup Maple Syrup

#5. Table Sugar

Table Sugar
Table Sugar

Table sugar is a commonly available substitute for brown rice syrup. While brown rice syrup is a healthier alternative to sugar, table sugar can still be the next best thing in a pinch.

You can use sugar as a topping for desserts, mix sugar with some heavy whipped cream or yogurt. If you’re health-conscious, there are many varieties of sugar available. You can opt for less refined sugars instead.

1 Cup Brown Rice Syrup = ½ Cup Table Sugar

#6. Corn Syrup

Corn Syrup
Corn Syrup

Corn syrup is a starchy sugary substance derived from corn flour. It has high levels of fructose and a slightly thinner consistency but a similar taste to brown rice syrup. Corn syrup in your recipe won’t alter the final product except add a mild flavor of vanilla or molasses.

Corn syrup has the same effect as brown rice syrup whether you use it for cooking or sweetening your dish. They’re pretty much interchangeable, so feel free to substitute them evenly in your recipe.

1 Cup Brown Rice Syrup = 1 Cup Corn syrup

#7. Blackstrap Molasses

Blackstrap Molasses
Blackstrap Molasses

Molasses is the dark and thick sugary by-product of processing sugarcane to produce sugar. Like honey and date syrup, it’s also one of the oldest sweeteners in use. The flavor of molasses can be described as warm, sweet, and somewhat smoky.

Using blackstrap molasses may also alter the appearance of your dish. It’s also more viscous, so remember to use molasses in moderation. Too much molasses can render a dessert both unsightly and unpalatable.

However, it’s much sweeter and rich in nutrients like calcium, magnesium, and iron. Molasses is a workable alternative to brown rice syrup in a sticky situation.

1 Cup Brown Rice Syrup = 1 Cup Blackstrap Molasses

#8. Glucose Syrup

Glucose Syrup
Glucose Syrup

Glucose syrup is a sweetener popularly used in commercial foods like candy or donuts. You can make glucose syrup using different ingredients, including brown rice, cornstarch, and potatoes. Brown rice syrup is a type of glucose syrup, and glucose is present in various fruits and vegetables.

When substituting glucose syrup, use an equal amount. They both taste nearly the same and have a similar consistency, thus delivering the same result.

1 Cup Brown Rice Syrup = 1 Cup Glucose Syrup

#9. Stevia

Stevia
Stevia

Stevia is a natural sweetener that comes from the leaves of the stevia plant, a member of the chrysanthemum family. With zero calories and zero carbs, liquid stevia is the best substitute for brown rice syrup if you’re trying to lose weight. It gives a slight aftertaste of licorice that, in most cases, will prove to be a welcome surprise.

While it is low in carbs and calories, do not underestimate the sweetness of stevia. Stevia can be up to 300 times sweeter than sugar. It’s a tremendously potent sweetener, so remember to be careful when using it. A single drop of liquid stevia dissolved in water or some other liquid is as sweet as a cup of sugar or brown rice syrup.

1 Cup Brown Rice Sugar = 1 or 2 Drops of Stevia

AboutKashmir Brummel

As a former restaurant reviewer, I’m now dedicated to exploring the story behind the foods we eat, whether it’s the history or a dish or the origin of the ingredients. When I’m not writing about food, you’ll find me on a terrace in Barcelona.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *